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Celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. : From Selma to Minneapolis – The Struggle Continues: Yesterday: Selma

A celebration and look back at the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the plight of Black people during the Civil Rights Movement. The question remains, has the dream been fulfilled?

Selma to Montgomery March at the Edmund Pettus Bridge

Bloody Sunday in Selma, AL

Tear gas fumes fill the air as state troopers, ordered by Governor George Wallace, break up a demonstration march in Selma, Alabama, on March 7, 1965, a date that is known as "Bloody Sunday." As several hundred marchers crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge to begin their protest march to Montgomery, state troopers violently assaulted the crowd with clubs and whips. A shocked nation watched the police brutality on television and demanded that Washington intervene and protect voting rights for blacks.

 

"Bloody Sunday: State Troopers Break up Selma to Montgomery March." The American Mosaic: The African American Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2020, africanamerican2.abc-clio.com/Search/Display/2255695. Accessed 10 Dec. 2020

News and Research Articles

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Valencia Streaming Resources

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Films on Demand:  (You must first be logged into your Valencia College Atlas Account to access these articles from the Valencia Library databases.)

  • Civil Rights: Selma to Montgomery (Silent):  The Selma-to-Montgomery marches marked the political and emotional peak of the American civil rights movement. This peaceful period film footage gives a strong sense of the size of these marches and the solidarity of the marchers, black and white. From the National Archives and Records Administration. (46 minutes)
  • We Shall Not Be Moved:  In this untold chapter in the struggle for American Civil Rights, learn how committed and fearless American churches played a pivotal role in the American Civil Rights Movement.  Narrated by Ossie Davis.(45 minutes)
  • Stirrings:  College students played a pivotal role in the protest movement of the ’50s and ’60s. Haskell Ward recalls his own college years, discusses new trends and developments with students at Morehouse, Spelman, Morris Brown, and Clark Atlanta University, and evaluates African-American progress with student activists, elected representatives, educators, and civil rights leaders, including Vernon Jordan, Jr. In the process, the program shows how Atlanta has become the cathedral city of American success. (47 minutes)
  • Rise! (1940-1968): The African Americans - Many Rivers to Cross:  This film examines the long road to civil rights, when the deep contradictions in American society finally became unsustainable. African Americans who fought fascism in World War II came home to face the same old racial violence. The success of black entrepreneurs and entertainers fueled African-American hopes and dreams. In 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama, heralding the dawn of a movement of resistance, with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as its public face. Before long, masses of African Americans practiced this nonviolent approach to integrate public schools, lunch counters and more. In 1968, Dr. King was assassinated, unleashing a new call for “Black Power” across the country. (56 minutes)